LeEco takes on tech titans in US

LePro 3 will be priced at $399 and Le S3 at $249 when they become available to US buyers. Photo: AFP

LePro 3 will be priced at $399 and Le S3 at $249 when they become available to US buyers. Photo: AFP

San Francisco: A Chinese Internet colossus referred to as a combination of Netflix, Apple, Amazon and Tesla announced on Wednesday it is taking on US tech titans on their home turf.

LeEco is jumping into a fiercely competitive US smartphone market with LePro 3 and its ‘little brother’ Le S3, pricing them lower than flagship models from rivals to entice people over to its “ecosystem” of online offerings.

LePro 3 will be priced at $399 and Le S3 at $249 when they become available to US buyers at the company’s LeMall.com e-commerce website on 2 November.

Analysts expected it to take more than bargains on handsets to win people away from what Apple and Google provide when it comes to meshing mobile devices with digital content, applications and services.

“Oftentimes people are locked into ecosystems,” Gartner analyst Brian Blau told AFP.

“The trouble for LeEco is they have to create something that is going to impress people enough to switch.”

The LeEco cloud service was portrayed as a nervous-system of sorts that would connect the company’s various devices and be a conduit for digital content and services.

Apple and Google have invested heavily in meshing devices, software and content to get people to play, work and shop in “ecosystems” the companies have built.

“The market (LeEco) is entering with some devices is hyper-competitive with global players,” Blau said.

“To think that they can come in and have an impact early on is unrealistic.”

LeEco founder and chief executive Jia Yueting set a goal of winning hearts and minds in the key North America market before moving to lure the rest of the world into the LeEco ecosystem.

At a press event at The Palace of Fine Arts in San Francisco, Jia acknowledged that some have told him “LeEco is crazy to come to the backyard” of companies such as Apple, Google, Netflix, Tesla and Amazon.

The company’s broad vision is to have self-driving electric cars, virtual reality headsets, smartphones, televisions, and smart bicycles all connected to its cloud platform for Netflix-style television streaming and other digital offerings.

“If they have a success here, it will be because of that cloud offering,” Blau said of LeEco.

“The ecosystems that are doing well are doing so because of services that tie devices together in the cloud.”

Along with smartphones, LeEco in November will hit the US with a line of Super4 X Series ultra high-definition televisions with prices beginning at $649 and topping out at $4,999 for a uMax85 that measures 85 inches diagonally.

The television market is rife with competitors, many making high-definition and smart models that tap into the Internet.

LeEco already provides on-demand streamed television in China, and announced it has an array of launch partners including film studio Lionsgate on board for its US debut.

“We have blazed a new path in the Internet content domain,” Jia said.

“This is the first time we will be able to achieve this in America.”

LeEco promised enticing bargains during a “flash sale” at LeMall on 2 November, out to make a splash in the market and get people using its Netflix-style subscription service for online content.

The company also displayed a virtual reality headset and its Super Bike packed with sensors, locks and other technology powered by Google-back Android software.

A new LeEco concept car that was being used in London for the filming of a new “Transformers” film directed by Michael Bay was rushed to San Francisco for the event.

Blau viewed the smart bicycles and electric cars shown off by LeEco “a bit of a tease” and something for the future.

LeEco had originally planned to have a prototype of a new generation self-driving electric car drive Jia up a ramp and onto the stage, but he jogged instead because the concept vehicle didn’t arrive in time.

No plans were revealed for releasing LeEco bicycles, cars or virtual reality gear in North America.

Jia maintained that LeEco wasn’t coming to North America to challenge US technology giants, but to “create an entirely new generation of products.”

[“Source-Gadgets”]

Twitter, Spotify, Reddit suffer Internet outage in US

The outages happened as hackers launched a large distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack on Dyn’s servers. Photo: AFP

The outages happened as hackers launched a large distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack on Dyn’s servers. Photo: AFP

Some major Internet companies suffered service disruptions on Friday due to what Internet infrastructure provider Dyn said was a cyber attack that affected some sites, mainly for users on the US East Coast.

Some US Internet users had trouble accessing sites including microblogging site Twitter , music streaming service Spotify, discussion site Reddit and news site Vox, but others found the sites accessible in Europe or via mobile phones.

Amazon’s web services unit said on its site that it had identified the root cause of the issue and was working to resolve it.

“Customers may experience failures indicating ‘hostname unknown’ or ‘unknown host exception’ when attempting to resolve the hostnames for AWS services and EC2 instances,” Amazon said in the announcement on its site.

Dyn said what it described as an “attack” was mainly affecting the East Coast and that its engineers were working on it.

The outages happened as hackers launched a large distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack on Dyn’s servers, tech news site Gizmodo reported.

An FBI representative said she had no immediate comment on the outages.

Dyn is a Manchester, New Hampshire-based provider of Internet infrastructure services, including managing DNS activity that connects a user to a website’s servers.

Dyn’s website says customers include some of the world’s biggest corporations and Internet firms: Pfizer, Visa, Netflix and Twitter, SoundCloud and BT.

A company representative could not immediately be reached to clarify Dyn’s statement, made via Twitter, on the outages. Reuters

[“Source-Gadgets”]

The possible vendetta behind US Internet attacks

Hackers launched a so-called distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack using ‘tens of millions’ of malware-infected devices connected to the internet. Photo: iStock

Hackers launched a so-called distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack using ‘tens of millions’ of malware-infected devices connected to the internet. Photo: iStock

London/New York: Millions of internet users lost access to some of the world’s most popular websites on Friday, as hackers hammered servers along the US East Coast with phony traffic until they crashed, then moved westward.

A global attack on one provider of Domain Name System services, Dyn Inc., took down sites including Twitter, Spotify, Reddit, CNN, Etsy and The New York Times for long stretches of time — from New York to Los Angeles.

Kyle York, chief strategy officer of Dyn, said the hackers launched a so-called distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack using “tens of millions” of malware-infected devices connected to the internet. Speaking during a conference call on Friday afternoon, York said Dyn was “actively” dealing with a “third wave” of the attack.

By Friday evening, Dyn said it had stopped the hacks. “As you can imagine it has been a crazy day,” Dyn spokesman Adam Coughlin wrote in an e-mail. “At this moment (knock on wood) service has been restored.”

Security professionals have been anticipating a rise in attacks coming from malware that targets the “Internet of Things,” a new breed of small gadgets that are connected to the internet. That was after a hacker released software code that powers such malware, called Mirai, several weeks ago.

Gillian M. Christensen, a spokeswoman for the Department of Homeland Security, said the agency and the FBI are aware of the incidents and “investigating all potential causes.”

Internet havoc

Dyn first reported site outages relating to the DDoS attack at around 7:10am New York time. The company restored service two hours later but was offline again at around noon, as another attack appeared to be underway, this time affecting the West Coast as well.

While DDoS attacks don’t steal anything, they create havoc across the internet — and are on the rise in volume and power.

Earlier in the day, Brian Krebs, a well-known journalist covering computer security, wrote that the timing of the attacks corresponded with the release of research conducted by Dyn’s director of internet analysis. Dyn highlighted potential connections between firms that offer to protect against DDoS attacks, and the hackers who conduct them. Krebs’s own website faced an “extremely large and unusual” DDoS attack after he published a story based on the same research, he said.

“We can’t confirm or even speculate on anyone’s motivation or relation to that research,” said Dave Allen, Dyn’s general counsel.

Common warfare

With attacks on the internet’s Domain Name System, hackers compromise the underlying technology that governs how the web functions, making the hack far more powerful and widespread.

The DNS translates website names into the Internet Protocol addresses that computers use to look up and access sites. But it has a design flaw: Sending a routine data request to a DNS server from one computer, the hacker can trick the system into sending a monster file of IP addresses back to the intended target. Multiply that by tens of thousands of computers under the hackers’ control, and the wall of data that flooded back is enormous. A small server may be capable of handling hundreds of simultaneous requests, but thousands every minute cause overload and ultimately shut down, taking the websites it hosts offline with it.

The practice often is employed by groups of hackers. In 2012, a DDoS attack forced offline the websites of Bank of America Corp., JPMorgan Chase & Co., Citigroup Inc., Wells Fargo & Co., U.S. Bancorp and PNC Financial Services Group Inc.

A DDoS can be achieved in a number of ways, but commonly involves a distributed network of so-called “zombie” machines, referred to as botnets. A botnet is formed with computers and other connected devices in homes or offices infected with malicious code which, upon the request of a hacker, can flood a web server with data. One or two machines wouldn’t be an issue, but if tens or hundreds of thousands fire such data simultaneously, it can cripple even the most sophisticated web servers.

In the case of the Dyn incident, the computers targeted were DNS servers. Without a DNS server, large numbers of websites are inaccessible by users across a country or even the world. In other words, taking away the DNS servers is like taking away all the road signs on a country’s highway system.

Single company targeted

So-called “authoritative” DNS providers like Dyn are notoriously hard to secure. Carl Herberger, vice president for security solutions at Radware, an Israeli-based internet security company, likens “authoritative” DNS providers to hospitals, which must admit anyone who shows up at the emergency room. Dyn must consider traffic going to a website as initially legitimate. In the event of a DDoS, Dyn must work quickly to sort out the bad traffic from the good, which takes time and resources, and creates outages that ripple across the internet, as was the case Friday.

Dave Palmer, director of technology at UK cybersecurity company Darktrace, said the most recent DDoS attacks have been linked to Internet of Things devices, in particular web cams.

“The joke about the Internet of Things was that you were going to get people hijacking people’s connected fridges to conduct these attacks, but in these recent cases the culprit seems to be webcams,” Palmer said. “We will probably see, when this is investigated, that it is a botnet of the Internet of Things.”

To avoid massive outages, companies ramp up their capacity to try to absorb the deluge of traffic and reroute it, often with the help of a major telecommunications carrier or cloud-services provider like Akamai Technologies Inc. and CloudFlare Inc. But the only way to really prevent denial-of-service attacks may be to increase the overall security level of consumers around the world, Palmer said, a task that is getting harder as more and more devices are connected to the Internet.

“This is exactly what happens when tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands of devices are left unprotected,” Palmer said. Bloomberg

[“Source-Gadgets”]

“Museums on Us” by Bank of America Provides Artful Inspiration

museumgoers (1)

A little known program by Bank of America, now in its 19th year, may provide opportunities for small businesses in 101 cities across the country. The “Museums on Us” program offers credit and debit card holders across the U.S. free access to 150 participating arts and culture institutions in 101 cities the first full weekend of every month.

It’s a unique promotion that has the potential to interest a fair amount of customers. And it also gives other businesses in those areas the opportunity to attract some of those same customers to their locations as well.

Here are some ways small businesses can make use of this type of program to draw in new customers.

“Museums on Us” Offers Discounts to Museumgoers

If you run a local store or restaurant near one of the participating museums, you could attract some of those museumgoers on the first weekend of each month by offering them discounts. Ask them to bring in the ticket stubs from their museum visit and offer them a percentage off their full bill or purchase. This encourages them to stop by your business after their outing and gives them a sort of exclusive offer. You can put signs up by your location to advertise the promotion, especially if potential customers might have to pass by in order to get to their museum of choice. Or you could advertise in local publications or buy some outdoor ad space near one of the participating museums.

Provide a Cultural Tie-in

People often go to museums for the culture, whether it’s an art museum, history museum, science museum or other type of attraction. So if your business can offer something similar, you could use that cultural feature to attract some of those same customers. For example, if you own a gift store, you could set up an exhibition of art from local artists on the first Saturday of the month and advertise it in local publications, as a way of bringing more people through the door. The people who enjoyed their time at a local museum could decide to make a whole day of it and stop by your location for an extra dose of culture for the weekend. And if one of your local museums is having a special exhibit that seems extremely popular, you could even theme your own event to piggyback on that.

Provide Trip Ideas

Travel websites or publications that highlight local attractions can use the “Museums on Us” program as a way to highlight other activities in the area as well. For example, you can put together a full weekend itinerary for potential travelers or even those who live in the area and are looking to have a “staycation.” Add the local museum that customers can access via the promotion, and then add in local restaurants, bars, parks, events, theaters and other activities that they can take part in before and after the museum. You can even create different themed itineraries — ones for families, couples, locals, etc. And if there’s more than one museum in your area that’s part of the program, you can come up with different themed itineraries for each one.

Partner with Local Schools

Many museums are especially popular with school groups, since there’s often an educational tie-in. And while there probably aren’t a whole lot of field trips going on over the first weekend of each month, there are plenty of parents who could take the opportunity to provide some cultural and educational activities for their kids. For that reason, partnering with local schools could be a great way to bring museumgoers into your business. You can work with teachers and administrators to get the word out that students who go to local museums with their families can then come to your location and receive some sort of discount or free gift afterward.

Host an Educational Contest

You can also get the educational community involved by hosting a contest that relates to one or more of the local museums involved in the “Museums on Us” program. Ask a question about one of the exhibits and allow people to submit answers throughout the weekend for the chance to win a prize (maybe a month long pass to that museum or another local attraction). You can also offer smaller discounts to everyone who enters just to get even more people involved in the promotion.

Art Museum Photo via Shutterstock

[“source-Business-standard”]

“Museums on Us” by Bank of America Provides Artful Inspiration

museumgoers (1)

A little known program by Bank of America, now in its 19th year, may provide opportunities for small businesses in 101 cities across the country. The “Museums on Us” program offers credit and debit card holders across the U.S. free access to 150 participating arts and culture institutions in 101 cities the first full weekend of every month.

It’s a unique promotion that has the potential to interest a fair amount of customers. And it also gives other businesses in those areas the opportunity to attract some of those same customers to their locations as well.

Here are some ways small businesses can make use of this type of program to draw in new customers.

“Museums on Us” Offers Discounts to Museumgoers

If you run a local store or restaurant near one of the participating museums, you could attract some of those museumgoers on the first weekend of each month by offering them discounts. Ask them to bring in the ticket stubs from their museum visit and offer them a percentage off their full bill or purchase. This encourages them to stop by your business after their outing and gives them a sort of exclusive offer. You can put signs up by your location to advertise the promotion, especially if potential customers might have to pass by in order to get to their museum of choice. Or you could advertise in local publications or buy some outdoor ad space near one of the participating museums.

Provide a Cultural Tie-in

People often go to museums for the culture, whether it’s an art museum, history museum, science museum or other type of attraction. So if your business can offer something similar, you could use that cultural feature to attract some of those same customers. For example, if you own a gift store, you could set up an exhibition of art from local artists on the first Saturday of the month and advertise it in local publications, as a way of bringing more people through the door. The people who enjoyed their time at a local museum could decide to make a whole day of it and stop by your location for an extra dose of culture for the weekend. And if one of your local museums is having a special exhibit that seems extremely popular, you could even theme your own event to piggyback on that.

Provide Trip Ideas

Travel websites or publications that highlight local attractions can use the “Museums on Us” program as a way to highlight other activities in the area as well. For example, you can put together a full weekend itinerary for potential travelers or even those who live in the area and are looking to have a “staycation.” Add the local museum that customers can access via the promotion, and then add in local restaurants, bars, parks, events, theaters and other activities that they can take part in before and after the museum. You can even create different themed itineraries — ones for families, couples, locals, etc. And if there’s more than one museum in your area that’s part of the program, you can come up with different themed itineraries for each one.

Partner with Local Schools

Many museums are especially popular with school groups, since there’s often an educational tie-in. And while there probably aren’t a whole lot of field trips going on over the first weekend of each month, there are plenty of parents who could take the opportunity to provide some cultural and educational activities for their kids. For that reason, partnering with local schools could be a great way to bring museumgoers into your business. You can work with teachers and administrators to get the word out that students who go to local museums with their families can then come to your location and receive some sort of discount or free gift afterward.

Host an Educational Contest

You can also get the educational community involved by hosting a contest that relates to one or more of the local museums involved in the “Museums on Us” program. Ask a question about one of the exhibits and allow people to submit answers throughout the weekend for the chance to win a prize (maybe a month long pass to that museum or another local attraction). You can also offer smaller discounts to everyone who enters just to get even more people involved in the promotion.

Art Museum Photo via Shutterstock

[“source-smallbiztrends”]

AT&T, Apple, Google to Work on ‘Robocall’ Crackdown in the US

AT&T, Apple, Google to Work on 'Robocall' Crackdown in the US

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Google, Apple among members of the “Robocall Strike Force”
  • The strike force hopes to implement Caller ID verification standards to help block calls from spoofed phone numbers
  • Other companies taking part include Blackberry, Microsoft, Nokia, Samsung

More than 30 major technology and communication companies said on Friday they are joining the US government to crack down on “robocalls,” automated, prerecorded phone calls that regulators have labelled a “scourge.”

AT&T, Google parent Alphabet, Apple, Verizon Communications and Comcast are among members of the “Robocall Strike Force” that held its first meeting with the US Federal Communications Commission.

The strike force will report to the FCC by October 19 on “concrete plans to accelerate the development and adoption of new tools and solutions,” said AT&T Chief Executive Officer Randall Stephenson, chairman of the group.

The strike force hopes to implement Caller ID verification standards to help block calls from spoofed phone numbers and consider a “Do Not Originate” list that would block spoofers from impersonating legitimate phone numbers from governments, banks or others.

FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler in July urged major companies to take new action to block robocalls, which often come from telemarketers or scam artists.

“This scourge must stop,” Wheeler said on Friday, calling robocalls the No. 1 complaint from consumers.

“The bad guys are beating the good guys with technology,” Wheeler said. In the past, he has said robocalls continue “due in large part to industry inaction.”

Stephenson emphasized “the breadth and complexity” of the problem.

“This is going to require more than individual company initiatives and one-off blocking apps,” Stephenson said. “Robocallers are a formidable adversary, notoriously hard to stop.”

The FCC does not require robocall blocking and filtering but has strongly encouraged phone service providers to offer those services at no charge.

The strike force brings together carriers, device makers, operating system developers, network designers and the government.

“We have to come out of this with a comprehensive play book for all of us to go execute,” Stephenson said. “We have calls that are perfectly legal, but unwanted, like telemarketers and public opinion surveyors. At the other end of the spectrum, we have millions of calls that are blatantly illegal.”

Stephenson said technical experts representing the companies have had “preliminary conversations about short- and longer-term initiatives.”

Joan Marsh, AT&T vice president of federal regulatory issues, called the problem complicated. “We have been wrangling with this problem long enough to know there is no silver bullet,” she said. “Nothing by itself is going to do it.”

Other companies taking part include Blackberry, British Telecommunications Plc, Charter Communications, Frontier Communications, LG Electronics, Microsoft, Nokia, Qualcomm, Samsung, Sirius XM Holdings, T-Mobile US and US Cellular Corp.

Consumers Union, a public advocacy group, said the task force is a sign “phone companies are taking more serious steps to protect their customers from unwanted calls.”

© Thomson Reuters 2016

Tags: Android, Apple, Apps, Google, Mobile, Telecom’
[“Source-Gadgets”]

 

Romanian Hacker ‘Guccifer’ Sentenced to 52 Months in US Prison

Romanian Hacker 'Guccifer' Sentenced to 52 Months in US Prison

Romanian Hacker ‘Guccifer’ Sentenced to 52 Months in US Prison
HIGHLIGHTS
Lazar breached Clinton’s private server at her home in New York
He is believed to have hacked into email accounts of about 100 victims
Victims include prominent political figures
A Romanian hacker nicknamed “Guccifer” who helped expose the existence of a private email domain Hillary Clinton used when she was US secretary of state was sentenced on Thursday to 52 months in prison by a federal court in Alexandria, Virginia.

Marcel Lazar, 44, who used the alias online, had pleaded guilty in May to charges including unauthorized access to a protected computer and aggravated identity theft after being extradited from Romania.

Lazar’s public defender, Shannon Quill, was not immediately available for comment.

Lazar has said in interviews he breached Clinton’s private server at her home in Chappaqua, New York, but law enforcement and national security officials say that claim is meritless.

Lazar is believed to have hacked into email accounts of about 100 victims between 2012 and 2014.

They include prominent political figures such as former Secretary of State Colin Powell, a relative of former President George W. Bush and Sidney Blumenthal, a former Clinton White House aide and an unofficial adviser to Clinton. Clinton is now the Democratic nominee for president.

(Also see: Romanian Man Charged for Bush Family Email Hack)
Lazar leaked online memos Blumenthal sent Clinton that were addressed to her private email account, which was used during her time as secretary of state to conduct both personal and work business in lieu of a government account.

Clinton’s email arrangement, which became the subject of an FBI investigation, has drawn intense scrutiny from Republicans attempting to sow doubt about her honesty ahead of the November 8 presidential election.

An entity calling itself “Guccifer 2.0” and claiming to be a Romanian hacker emerged in June and began taking credit for data breaches at the Democratic National Committee and Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee.

US intelligence officials and cyber security experts believe Guccifer 2.0 is a front for Russian intelligence services intended to spread confusion about the hacks against the Democratic Party.

© Thomson Reuters 2016

Share a screenshot and win Samsung smartphones worth Rs. 90,000 by participating in the #BrowseFaster contest.

Tags: Email, Hacker, Hacking, Internet, Social, Hillary Clinton

[“Source-Gadgets”]

Twitter to Share Ad Revenue on Videos by US Users

Twitter to Share Ad Revenue on Videos by US Users

Twitter to Share Ad Revenue on Videos by US Users
HIGHLIGHTS
Twitter offers revenue sharing to media and entertainment compani
New program will offer video creators a 70 percent share of revenue
Users would also be allowed to share their videos on other platforms
Twitter Inc on Tuesday stepped up its battle to attract video talent to its platform, saying it will allow US users who upload a video to share in any advertising revenue it generates.

Twitter, Facebook, Snapchat and YouTube are all competing to keep or recruit top video talent as they seek to cash in on the wave of televison-style advertising that has been moving to the internet.

Twitter already offers revenue sharing to media and entertainment companies such as CBS Corp and the National Football League which post videos through its Amplify Publisher Program. That option will now be open to any Twitter user, Twitter said in a blog post.

YouTube has long offered its video stars a cut of revenue. Facebook, for its part, has ramped up its Live video product in recent months and paid a relatively small number of media companies and celebrities to generate video.

Facebook said it is testing ways to “create a sustainable, long-term monetisation model for live video that includes new and different ways of sharing revenue with some partners.”
Instagram and Snapchat also rely heavily on celebrities, who often have millions of followers, to encourage user engagement and growth by posting personal photos and videos.

Twitter’s new program will offer video creators a 70 percent share of revenue. YouTube, which is owned by Alphabet Inc’s Google, shares 55 percent of the ad revenue with content creators.

Twitter said individual users would also be allowed to share their videos on other platforms.

Under Chief Executive Jack Dorsey, the company has made a significant push into video, signing deals with several media companies and sports organizations to stream major events.

Twitter shares dipped 0.5 percent to close at $18.38 on the New York Stock Exchange on Tuesday.

© Thomson Reuters 2016

Share a screenshot and win Samsung smartphones worth Rs. 90,000 by participating in the #BrowseFaster contest.

Tags: Twitter, Facebook, Snapchat, YouTube, Apps, Social, Home Entertainment

[“Source-Gadgets”]

Rupee closes weaker against US dollar at 66.89 ahead of IIP, CPI data

India’s 10-year bond yield closed at 7.103%, from its Thursday’s close of 7.083%. Pradeep Gaur/Mint

India’s 10-year bond yield closed at 7.103%, from its Thursday’s close of 7.083%. Pradeep Gaur/Mint

Mumbai: The Indian rupee closed lower against the US dollar ahead of the macroeconomic data due later on Friday.

The home currency closed at 66.89 a dollar, down 0.06% from its Thursday’s close of 66.84. The rupee opened at 66.84 a dollar and touched a high and a low of 66.79 and 66.89, respectively.

The government will issue Consumer Price Index (CPI)-based inflation data for July and Index of Industrial Production (IIP) data for June on 12 August after 5.30pm. According to a poll of Bloomberg analysts, CPI will be at 5.9% in July against 5.77% in June, while IIP will be at 1.6% in June against 1.2% in May.

Meanwhile, India’s 10-year bond yield closed at 7.103%, from its Thursday’s close of 7.083%.

India’s benchmark Sensex rose 1.05%, or 292.80 points, to close at 28,152.40. So far this year, it has gained 7.79%.

Year to date, the rupee is down 1%, while FIIs have bought $5.42 billion in equity and sold $1.16 million in debt markets.

Asian currencies weakened. Malaysian ringgit was down 0.57%, Taiwan dollar 0.34%, South Korean won 0.3%, Singapore dollar 0.22%, China offshore 0.21%, China renminbi 0.2%, Japanese yen 0.14%, Thai baht 0.13%, Indonesian rupiah 0.11%. However, Philippines peso was up 0.33%.

The dollar index, which measures the US currency’s strength against major currencies, was trading at 95.849, up 0.01% from its previous close of 95.857.

[“Source-Livemint”]

Pokemon Go Fans Told Not to Play in US Holocaust Museum

Pokemon Go Fans Told Not to Play in US Holocaust Museum

The US Holocaust Memorial Museum has told Pokemon Go fans not to play the popular new mobile game in its premises, describing it as “extremely inappropriate” in a memorial dedicated to the victims of Nazism.

The game involves using a mobile device to find and capture virtual Pokemon characters at real life locations, including apparently inside the Washington-based museum.

The idea of players roaming its halls, eyes glued to phones in search of the computerized figures, shocked many after an image was posted online showing one of the characters located outside the doors to the museum’s Helena Rubinstein Auditorium.

(Also see:  Pokemon Go Craze Crashes Servers, Draws Police Warnings)

“We are attempting to have the museum removed from the game,” the museum’s communications director, Andy Hollinger, said in a statement.

The museum encourages visitors to use their mobile phones to share and engage with exhibits while visiting, he added.

“Technology can be an important learning tool, but this game falls far outside of our educational and memorial mission,” Hollinger said.

x

During a visit to the museum on Tuesday, a Reuters reporter saw various visitors using phones to take photos or send messages, but no one obviously playing games. That included the area outside the Helena Rubinstein Auditorium, which features recorded testimonies from Jews who survived the gas chambers.

(Also see: Pokemon Go Is Responsible for These Real Life Weird and Scary Things)

Niantic, the game’s creator, did not respond to requests for comment about the museum’s complaint.

Interest in Pokemon Go has surged since its release last week. The game was the most downloaded free app on Apple’s app store, while Nintendo shares surged nearly 25 percent on Monday for their biggest daily gains ever based on its success.

On Tuesday, a Democratic US senator asked Niantic to clarify the game’s data privacy protections, amid concerns it was unnecessarily collecting lots of user data.

© Thomson Reuters 2016

Tags: Android, Apple, Apps, Gaming, iOS, Niantic, Nintendo, Pokemon, Pokemon Go

 

[“Source-Gadgets”]