What’s the Best Place to Look for New Product Inspiration?

uninspired look

 

Some entrepreneurs experience creative flashes or strokes of genius where they simply come up with new successful products. But more often, good entrepreneurs have to actually work to come up with those ideas.

Unfortunately, new product inspiration isn’t readily available on every corner. To come up with a product that is not only possible to make, but also solves a need for a specific market, you have to know where to look.

According to Stephen Key, author and co-founder of InventRight, entrepreneurs need to look no further than their own computer screens for new product inspiration. He wrote for Entrepreneur:

“Back in the day, I would walk the aisles of local stores for inspiration. These days, a wealth of information can be accessed with the click of a mouse. You don’t have to wonder what consumers wish was better about the products they use. It’s all right there! I’m talking about product reviews, particularly those found on Amazon. There are just so many.”

Product reviews on Amazon or other third-party sites can contain a wealth of information about the products people use and what they like and dislike about them.

For example, if your company sells accessories for electronics and is considering expanding into wireless speakers and audio equipment, you could browse the reviews in that product category for inspiration.

Not all reviews will necessarily be helpful. Some people just like to complain or leave ratings without actually explaining what they liked or didn’t like about the product.

But if you notice that most people seem to like or dislike something specific about a particular product, that could be worth noting.

You might, for instance, notice that people are unhappy with the sizes of the current wireless speakers on the market. They might be interested in something smaller than what’s available. Your company could fill that void in the market.

There’s no foolproof way to ensure that your product will be successful. But by doing the proper research, you can definitely improve your odds. And online reviews should at the very least be part of that research process.

Uninspired Photo via Shutterstock

Andy Murray, Milos Raonic Look to Ivan Lendl and John McEnroe For Wimbledon Glory

Andy Murray 0807 2016

Andy Murray will be gunning for his second Wimbledon crown as he prepares to take on Milos Raonic.

© AFP

HIGHLIGHTS

  • 1Andy Murray is aiming for his second Wimbledon title
  • 2Murray is coached by Ivan Lendl
  • 3Raonic, playing his maiden Grand Slam final, is coached by John McEnroe

Andy Murray targets a second Wimbledon title Sunday when he faces big-serving Milos Raonic, but super coaches Ivan Lendl and John McEnroe could be the key players.

World number two Murray is looking to add this year’s All England Club crown to his 2012 US Open and 2013 Wimbledon titles, both of which were won when Lendl was first working with the 29-year-old.

“I do think it helps. I do think in these situations it can make a difference,” said Murray as he analysed the influence of Lendl who won eight majorsin his own playing career although never triumphed at Wimbledon.

“The information I get from him, the psychological help that I get from having him around, being able to chat to him at these events, before the big matches makes a difference. That’s why I think we’ve been a good team. I think we both trust each other.”

Murray reunited with Lendl this summer after they went their separate ways after two years together in 2014.

Raonic, the first Canadian man to reach a Grand Slam final, teamed up with McEnroe just for the grass court season.

While Lendl has been stony-faced in the player’s box, McEnroe has been splitting his time between Raonic’s needs and his own long-standing TV commitments.

When Raonic stunned Roger Federer in the semi-finals, McEnroe was calling the match for the BBC from the commentary box on Centre Court.

“At the end of the day, I get to win Wimbledon. Who cares?” said 25-year-old Raonic when asked if he was concerned over McEnroe’s media obligations.

TV work

Murray finds himself in the unusual position of favourite to lift the title on Sunday as he chases a third career Grand Slam crown.

It will be the first Wimbledon final since 2002 not to feature Novak Djokovic, Federer or Rafael Nadal.

It will also be Murray’s first final from 11 at the majors where he hasn’t faced either Djokovic or Federer against whom he has lost eight times.

But the second seed won’t underestimate Raonic who reached the final by coming from two sets to one down to defeat seven-time champion Federer.

“Milos is a very tough opponent. He’s played very well on the grass this year and has earned his right to the final by beating one of the best, if not the best player, ever at this event.”

Djokovic, who beat Murray in the Australian and French Open finals this year, was knocked out in the third round of Wimbledon, his earliest exit at a major in seven years.

Nadal, a two-time champion at the All England Club, never made the starting line because of a wrist injury.

Having faced Djokovic in seven major finals and Federer, who beat the Scot in his first Wimbledon final in 2012, in the other three, Murray will take a 6-3 lead in his head to head record with Raonic into the final.

He will be buoyed by defeating the 25-year-old on grass three weeks ago in the Queen’s Club final, 6-7 (5/7), 6-4, 6-3.

Murray also came back from two sets to one down to beat the big Canadian in the semi-finals in the Australian Open in January.

Raonic packs the fastest serve of the tournament so far, sending down a 144mph (231.7km/h) ace early in the semi-final against Federer.

He saved eight of nine break points in that tie and boasts a tournament-leading 137 aces.

Raonic has been taken the distance on two occasions at this Wimbledon — against Federer and coming back from two sets to love down to beat David Goffin in the third round.

“Andy is one of the premier workaholics,” said Raonic who was a beaten semi-finalist in 2014.

“I think Andy tries to get you doing a lot of different things. He’ll try to throw you off, give you some slower balls, some harder balls, all these kinds of things. I guess my goal is to keep him away from that, play it on my terms, be aggressive, not hesitate.”

[“source-ndtv”]

Andy Murray, Milos Raonic Look to Ivan Lendl and John McEnroe For Wimbledon Glory

Andy Murray 0807 2016

Andy Murray will be gunning for his second Wimbledon crown as he prepares to take on Milos Raonic.

© AFP

HIGHLIGHTS

  • 1Andy Murray is aiming for his second Wimbledon title
  • 2Murray is coached by Ivan Lendl
  • 3Raonic, playing his maiden Grand Slam final, is coached by John McEnroe

Andy Murray targets a second Wimbledon title Sunday when he faces big-serving Milos Raonic, but super coaches Ivan Lendl and John McEnroe could be the key players.

World number two Murray is looking to add this year’s All England Club crown to his 2012 US Open and 2013 Wimbledon titles, both of which were won when Lendl was first working with the 29-year-old.

“I do think it helps. I do think in these situations it can make a difference,” said Murray as he analysed the influence of Lendl who won eight majorsin his own playing career although never triumphed at Wimbledon.

“The information I get from him, the psychological help that I get from having him around, being able to chat to him at these events, before the big matches makes a difference. That’s why I think we’ve been a good team. I think we both trust each other.”

Murray reunited with Lendl this summer after they went their separate ways after two years together in 2014.

Raonic, the first Canadian man to reach a Grand Slam final, teamed up with McEnroe just for the grass court season.

While Lendl has been stony-faced in the player’s box, McEnroe has been splitting his time between Raonic’s needs and his own long-standing TV commitments.

When Raonic stunned Roger Federer in the semi-finals, McEnroe was calling the match for the BBC from the commentary box on Centre Court.

“At the end of the day, I get to win Wimbledon. Who cares?” said 25-year-old Raonic when asked if he was concerned over McEnroe’s media obligations.

TV work

Murray finds himself in the unusual position of favourite to lift the title on Sunday as he chases a third career Grand Slam crown.

It will be the first Wimbledon final since 2002 not to feature Novak Djokovic, Federer or Rafael Nadal.

It will also be Murray’s first final from 11 at the majors where he hasn’t faced either Djokovic or Federer against whom he has lost eight times.

But the second seed won’t underestimate Raonic who reached the final by coming from two sets to one down to defeat seven-time champion Federer.

“Milos is a very tough opponent. He’s played very well on the grass this year and has earned his right to the final by beating one of the best, if not the best player, ever at this event.”

Djokovic, who beat Murray in the Australian and French Open finals this year, was knocked out in the third round of Wimbledon, his earliest exit at a major in seven years.

Nadal, a two-time champion at the All England Club, never made the starting line because of a wrist injury.

Having faced Djokovic in seven major finals and Federer, who beat the Scot in his first Wimbledon final in 2012, in the other three, Murray will take a 6-3 lead in his head to head record with Raonic into the final.

He will be buoyed by defeating the 25-year-old on grass three weeks ago in the Queen’s Club final, 6-7 (5/7), 6-4, 6-3.

Murray also came back from two sets to one down to beat the big Canadian in the semi-finals in the Australian Open in January.

Raonic packs the fastest serve of the tournament so far, sending down a 144mph (231.7km/h) ace early in the semi-final against Federer.

He saved eight of nine break points in that tie and boasts a tournament-leading 137 aces.

Raonic has been taken the distance on two occasions at this Wimbledon — against Federer and coming back from two sets to love down to beat David Goffin in the third round.

“Andy is one of the premier workaholics,” said Raonic who was a beaten semi-finalist in 2014.

“I think Andy tries to get you doing a lot of different things. He’ll try to throw you off, give you some slower balls, some harder balls, all these kinds of things. I guess my goal is to keep him away from that, play it on my terms, be aggressive, not hesitate.”

[“source-ndtv”]

India’s E-trade area to look $a hundred and twenty Billion sales by means of 2020: examine

India's E-Commerce Sector to See $120 Billion Revenue by 2020: Study

The u . s .‘s e-trade sector is expected to peer sales of $one hundred twenty billion by means of 2020 from $30 billion on the stop of closing monetary, a file said.

The increase would be specially at the returned of young demographic profile, growing internetpenetration and relatively higher economic performance, the Assocham-Forrester have a look at said.

India’s e-trade region saw sales of $30 billion (more or less Rs. 1,ninety nine,450 crores) on the cease of the financial yr 2015-sixteen. it is anticipated to reach $120 billion (kind of Rs. 7,97,800 crores) through2020, it stated.

even as in phrases of base, India may be decrease than China and other giants like Japan, the Indian feeof boom is way ahead of others. in opposition to India’s annual enlargement of fifty one percent, China’s e-commerce is growing at 18 percentage, Japan eleven percent and South Korea 10 percentage,” thestudy referred to.

The record further said that India has a web consumer base of 400 million in 2016 while Brazil has 210 million internet users and Russia a hundred thirty million, a number of the BRICS countries.

about seventy five percentage of the u . s .‘s online users are inside the age institution of 15-34 yearsdue to the fact that India is one of the youngest demographies globally and one out of every 5 (onlineuser) visits the Indian Railways web site, the document stated.

In India, about 60-sixty five percentage of the whole e-trade sales are being generated thru clevertelephones. Branded apparel, add-ons, jewellery, items, shoes are the various fundamental hits at thee-commerce structures, it added.

down load the devices 360 app for Android and iOS to live updated with the ultra-modern techinformation, product opinions, and specific offers at the popular mobiles.

A-Z living: an inside look at typographer Alan Kitching’s home

Alan Kitching at home in south London; the building is a former alehouse.
The graphic prints of one of Britain’s greatest typographers are instantly recognisable, and they’re all created in his unassuming south London home
Alan Kitching at home in south London; the building is a former alehouse.
Alan Kitching at home in south London; the building is a former alehouse.
The rooms in Alan Kitching’s home are arranged like one of his letterpress prints. Some are stacked, some are wedged, some aren’t in the right place. One dominates, while others bow out. But each room, like each letter, makes an impact and has a purpose.

From the outside, it’s obvious this isn’t an ordinary home: three large, shop-style window panels showcase Kitching’s iconic prints – word-based images in big, bold type. A fourth is given over to local notices: jumble sales and student art shows. “That was Celia’s idea,” Kitching says. “She was more gregarious than me.” Celia Stothard, his late wife, bought the property 19 years ago. She chose it for its flexibility: a place for them to live and hold talks, exhibitions and performances. She was a designer and artist, too, as well as a jazz singer.

The building is a former alehouse in Kennington, south London, buttressed up against a courthouse (local folklore has it that Charlie Chaplin used to come here to fetch jugs of ale for his mother). Storage rooms cascade off the back of the ground floor, where Kitching runs the Typography Workshop, into a cellar crammed with his extensive, 19th-century type collection. Upstairs, a high-ceilinged mezzanine has a reading nook reachable only by the swivel of a library ladder.

Alan Kitching in his workshop.
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Kitching in his workshop. Photograph: Suki Dhanda for the Guardian
The printing craft lends itself well to interior decoration. Plan chests double as tabletops. An old iron printing press (from Kitching’s apprenticeship) is as much machine as objet d’art. Wooden type blocks are simply pleasing to look at. And then there are the prints themselves: Kitching’s book and magazine covers, work for commercial and private clients, design competition pieces all adorn the walls.

Before the couple moved in, the building housed a mail-order fashion company. “The place was full of people packing T-shirts and frocks,” he says. “There were no cooking facilities. At first we lived very primitively.” Stothard’s studio was upstairs and Kitching’s downstairs, and they’d communicate via notes.

That work-focused ethos is reflected in the layout. Given the size of the house, the kitchen, bathroom and bedroom are tiny. “Most kitchens are too big,” Kitching says. “They’ve got the thing [island] in the middle, cupboards all over the place. I’ve been in houses where it looks well designed, but you have to walk around all the time.” His galley kitchen has utensils hanging from hooks, with all ingredients within two steps’ reach of a small worktop. “I like constrained living, because it frees you from having to think about it all too much.” He favours shallow cupboards, where everything’s on display. “It’s about utility, no fuss.”

His tiny kitchen.
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The tiny kitchen. Photograph: Suki Dhanda for the Guardian
Kitching, now 75, grew up in a two-up, two-down in Darlington. On leaving school, he wanted to be a poster artist, but that was deemed “a bit odd” in the big railway town, so he took up the closest thing, an apprenticeship as a typesetter. Print jobs followed, and as a technician at Watford School of Art, he met the Modernist designer Anthony Froshaug, who became a mentor. In the 1970s, Kitching established himself as a graphic designer and lived with his first wife, Rita, in Richmond, where they brought up two sons. But Rita died young, from breast cancer, and after her death he moved the boys into central London and redirected his practice to making typographical art prints.

These days, he spends most of his time in his bright ground-floor studio. On the sills lies a sun-bleached “cabinet of curiosities”: two fossilised frogs, a mini boomerang, an Eiffel Tower figurine, all put there for passing children to gawk at. “Three- and four-year-olds stop and say, ‘Look at this! What’s that?’ I can hear them; they can’t see me. You hear all these conversations outside: people on their phones, coming out of the court having an argument.”

Kitching established himself as a graphic designer in the 1970s.
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Kitching established himself as a graphic designer in the 1970s. Photograph: Suki Dhanda for the Guardian
Kitching’s workshop is behind the studio, with clear plastic panels for a roof. “It’s like working outside in daylight.” Hanging from the drying racks are rough poster designs for his forthcoming Somerset House retrospective. Surfaces teem with rollers, rags and pots of paint. It is a bit cold, he admits, but “I don’t really notice it. My assistants do, but I tell them to put on more jumpers.”

Celia passed away five years ago, aged 61, but she’s still everywhere in the house: prints by her, paintings of her, newspaper cuttings she stuck on the wall. And, while Kitching enjoys his own company, he says he’d rather have someone with him. “We’d always meet for coffee at 11 and have dinner together.” He recently had in some schoolchildren to create a mural for the Southbank. “Celia would have been beside herself: it was the perfect project for what she was trying to do with this place. In a way, I’m trying to fulfil her wishes.”

Does he see himself growing older here? “I couldn’t leave London,” he says. “I’ve got so used to the convenience. I like to be in close contact, if you like.” And in this house? “Everything I need is here. Plus, everywhere else I’ve lived has been conventional and I wouldn’t want to go back to that life – you know, carpets and Hoovers.” He laughs. “Work comes first, living comes second. I haven’t got time for vacuuming.”

The entrance with its panelled windows
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The entrance with its panelled windows, from behind which Kitching can see and hear the goings-on outside. Photograph: Suki Dhanda for the Guardian
House rules
First piece of furniture An old farmhouse chair from an antique shop in Richmond in 1969.

Change in neighbourhood The estate agents used to be very low-key.

Interior design hero Norman Potter: he had an honest, minimal approach to design, always conditioned by the space.

Letters
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Biggest extravagance The Wrington Collection of theatrical type that we bought from an old printers’ in Somerset.

Last home purchase An espresso machine.

Most treasured possessions A wooden pencil box my father made for me; and a picture of Celia sitting in our studio.

One thing you would change I’d add a veranda because there’s no garden. But I think it’s too late now.

• Alan Kitching Special Edition: A Life In Letterpress is published by Laurence King on 7 April. An exhibition runs at Somerset House, London WC1, from 21 April-2 May, as part of its Pick Me Up festival.

[“source-theguardian”]

Bill Gates Says ‘Will Look Into’ Age of Empires Sequel

Bill Gates Says 'Will Look Into' Age of Empires Sequel

Bill Gates, co-founder of Microsoft and one half of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, recently took to user-curated social news website Reddit to answer any questions people had in what he said was his fourth Reddit AMA (Ask Me Anything).

Gates dealt in a lot of topics, from bio-terrorism to his life at Harvard to what he prefers between sushi and Thai food. A user by the name of le-click took the opportunity to ask him about the possibility of a sequel for popular real-time strategy game Age of Empires, which has been published by Microsoft since its inception.

“Mr. Gates, can we please have another Age of Empires? Not sure if this is your department, but I figured I’d ask since you were here…

Thanks!”

Fortunately for all video gamers, Gates obliged and cheekily replied:

“I will look into this. How many empires do you need?”

Age of Empires remains one of the most successful RTS franchises in video gaming history. It has been responsible for a lot of innovation in the genre, and also spawned a critically acclaimed and popular spin-off in Age of Mythology, which transported the game’s elements into the Greek, Egyptian, and Nordic mythical stories.

AOE2_wallpaper_official.jpgThe 1999 Age of Empires II: The Age of Kings is generally heralded as the series’ finest entry, and following the failure of Age of Empires III, developer Ensemble Studios has focused on improving the second chapter, by way of giving it a HD upgrade in 2013, and adding a new civilisation and campaign in following years.

Are you interested in a new Age of Empires game? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below or tweet to us @Gadgets360 with #AoE.

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[“source-Gadgets”]