4chan Users Claim to Have Hacked Hillary Clinton Campaign Chairman John Podesta’s iPhone, iPad4chan Users Claim to Have Hacked Hillary Clinton Campaign Chairman John Podesta’s iPhone, iPad

4chan Users Claim to Have Hacked Hillary Clinton Campaign Chairman John Podesta's iPhone, iPad

4chan Users Claim to Have Hacked Hillary Clinton Campaign Chairman John Podesta’s iPhone, iPad
HIGHLIGHTS
4chan hackers found John Podesta’s password in WikiLeaks email dump
WikiLeaks, however, says it had changed password before releasing emails
Podesta’s Twitter account had been hacked earlier as well
Hackers on a 4chan message board claim to have wiped the iPhone and iPad of Hillary Clinton’s campaign chairman John Podesta. The hackers got access to Podesta’s Apple devices within 12 hours of WikiLeaks releasing private emails from his accounts on Wednesday, which apparently included his Apple ID credentials as well as his Social Security number.

View image on TwitterView image on Twitter
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Pwn All The Things @pwnallthethings
Took about ~25 minutes from WL posting “part 5” emails before 4Chan had found Podesta’s Apple creds and logged in for first time fyi.
11:51 PM – 13 Oct 2016
58 58 Retweets 52 52 likes

13 Oct
Pwn All The Things @pwnallthethings
Apparently some asshole from anonymous compromised Podesta’s Apple account using creds in WL dump and remotely wiped his phone. V cruel. pic.twitter.com/ZdfWf2NkuY
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Pwn All The Things @pwnallthethings
4chan also apparently wiped Podesta’s iPad. pic.twitter.com/HzALdTvr98
10:56 PM – 13 Oct 2016
View image on Twitter
61 61 Retweets 38 38 likes
Before erasing the iPhone and iPad, 4chan users on a Reddit thread claim that they downloaded the data from Podesta’s email account. Talking to Gizmodo, a representative of the hackers said that information in the Podesta leaks was “helpful in conducting phishing attacks for the DNC members before the leaks emerged on Wikileaks.”

The hacker was able to get access the passwords of several dozen senators’ email IDs, credit card information, as well Social Security numbers. The list includes the likes of US Vice President Joe Biden, acting chair of Democratic National Party (DNC) Donna Brazile, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi.

However, WikiLeaks on its Twitter handle said that it had changed the relevant credentials before releasing the email dump. Regardless of the veracity of the claim, it appears Podesta did not change his credentials including his Apple ID, despite his emails having been released to the public.

14 Oct
WikiLeaks ✔ @wikileaks
@mkarolian No they didn’t. We checked that the credentials had already been changed.
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Basement Dweller Chi @CasaChichi
@wikileaks @mkarolian Ha! Masterful work and delivery. Long live WikiLeaks ♥
1:23 AM – 14 Oct 2016
15 15 Retweets 54 54 likes

The screenshots show that Podesta had not enabled two-factor verification – an added layer of security – on his Apple ID.

Soon after the WikiLeaks dump, Podesta’s Twitter account was hacked and a tweet asking followers to vote for Clinton’s rival Donald Trump was sent out. The tweet was deleted later. The Clinton campaign has confirmed the hacked Twitter account, but has not said anything about the wiped iPhone and iPad.

Tags: Apple, Apple ID, Hillary Clinton, John Podesta, Hacking, iPhone, iPad, Cyber-security, Cyber-crime, Twitter, 4chan

[“Source-Gadgets”]

Andy Murray, Milos Raonic Look to Ivan Lendl and John McEnroe For Wimbledon Glory

Andy Murray 0807 2016

Andy Murray will be gunning for his second Wimbledon crown as he prepares to take on Milos Raonic.

© AFP

HIGHLIGHTS

  • 1Andy Murray is aiming for his second Wimbledon title
  • 2Murray is coached by Ivan Lendl
  • 3Raonic, playing his maiden Grand Slam final, is coached by John McEnroe

Andy Murray targets a second Wimbledon title Sunday when he faces big-serving Milos Raonic, but super coaches Ivan Lendl and John McEnroe could be the key players.

World number two Murray is looking to add this year’s All England Club crown to his 2012 US Open and 2013 Wimbledon titles, both of which were won when Lendl was first working with the 29-year-old.

“I do think it helps. I do think in these situations it can make a difference,” said Murray as he analysed the influence of Lendl who won eight majorsin his own playing career although never triumphed at Wimbledon.

“The information I get from him, the psychological help that I get from having him around, being able to chat to him at these events, before the big matches makes a difference. That’s why I think we’ve been a good team. I think we both trust each other.”

Murray reunited with Lendl this summer after they went their separate ways after two years together in 2014.

Raonic, the first Canadian man to reach a Grand Slam final, teamed up with McEnroe just for the grass court season.

While Lendl has been stony-faced in the player’s box, McEnroe has been splitting his time between Raonic’s needs and his own long-standing TV commitments.

When Raonic stunned Roger Federer in the semi-finals, McEnroe was calling the match for the BBC from the commentary box on Centre Court.

“At the end of the day, I get to win Wimbledon. Who cares?” said 25-year-old Raonic when asked if he was concerned over McEnroe’s media obligations.

TV work

Murray finds himself in the unusual position of favourite to lift the title on Sunday as he chases a third career Grand Slam crown.

It will be the first Wimbledon final since 2002 not to feature Novak Djokovic, Federer or Rafael Nadal.

It will also be Murray’s first final from 11 at the majors where he hasn’t faced either Djokovic or Federer against whom he has lost eight times.

But the second seed won’t underestimate Raonic who reached the final by coming from two sets to one down to defeat seven-time champion Federer.

“Milos is a very tough opponent. He’s played very well on the grass this year and has earned his right to the final by beating one of the best, if not the best player, ever at this event.”

Djokovic, who beat Murray in the Australian and French Open finals this year, was knocked out in the third round of Wimbledon, his earliest exit at a major in seven years.

Nadal, a two-time champion at the All England Club, never made the starting line because of a wrist injury.

Having faced Djokovic in seven major finals and Federer, who beat the Scot in his first Wimbledon final in 2012, in the other three, Murray will take a 6-3 lead in his head to head record with Raonic into the final.

He will be buoyed by defeating the 25-year-old on grass three weeks ago in the Queen’s Club final, 6-7 (5/7), 6-4, 6-3.

Murray also came back from two sets to one down to beat the big Canadian in the semi-finals in the Australian Open in January.

Raonic packs the fastest serve of the tournament so far, sending down a 144mph (231.7km/h) ace early in the semi-final against Federer.

He saved eight of nine break points in that tie and boasts a tournament-leading 137 aces.

Raonic has been taken the distance on two occasions at this Wimbledon — against Federer and coming back from two sets to love down to beat David Goffin in the third round.

“Andy is one of the premier workaholics,” said Raonic who was a beaten semi-finalist in 2014.

“I think Andy tries to get you doing a lot of different things. He’ll try to throw you off, give you some slower balls, some harder balls, all these kinds of things. I guess my goal is to keep him away from that, play it on my terms, be aggressive, not hesitate.”

[“source-ndtv”]

Andy Murray, Milos Raonic Look to Ivan Lendl and John McEnroe For Wimbledon Glory

Andy Murray 0807 2016

Andy Murray will be gunning for his second Wimbledon crown as he prepares to take on Milos Raonic.

© AFP

HIGHLIGHTS

  • 1Andy Murray is aiming for his second Wimbledon title
  • 2Murray is coached by Ivan Lendl
  • 3Raonic, playing his maiden Grand Slam final, is coached by John McEnroe

Andy Murray targets a second Wimbledon title Sunday when he faces big-serving Milos Raonic, but super coaches Ivan Lendl and John McEnroe could be the key players.

World number two Murray is looking to add this year’s All England Club crown to his 2012 US Open and 2013 Wimbledon titles, both of which were won when Lendl was first working with the 29-year-old.

“I do think it helps. I do think in these situations it can make a difference,” said Murray as he analysed the influence of Lendl who won eight majorsin his own playing career although never triumphed at Wimbledon.

“The information I get from him, the psychological help that I get from having him around, being able to chat to him at these events, before the big matches makes a difference. That’s why I think we’ve been a good team. I think we both trust each other.”

Murray reunited with Lendl this summer after they went their separate ways after two years together in 2014.

Raonic, the first Canadian man to reach a Grand Slam final, teamed up with McEnroe just for the grass court season.

While Lendl has been stony-faced in the player’s box, McEnroe has been splitting his time between Raonic’s needs and his own long-standing TV commitments.

When Raonic stunned Roger Federer in the semi-finals, McEnroe was calling the match for the BBC from the commentary box on Centre Court.

“At the end of the day, I get to win Wimbledon. Who cares?” said 25-year-old Raonic when asked if he was concerned over McEnroe’s media obligations.

TV work

Murray finds himself in the unusual position of favourite to lift the title on Sunday as he chases a third career Grand Slam crown.

It will be the first Wimbledon final since 2002 not to feature Novak Djokovic, Federer or Rafael Nadal.

It will also be Murray’s first final from 11 at the majors where he hasn’t faced either Djokovic or Federer against whom he has lost eight times.

But the second seed won’t underestimate Raonic who reached the final by coming from two sets to one down to defeat seven-time champion Federer.

“Milos is a very tough opponent. He’s played very well on the grass this year and has earned his right to the final by beating one of the best, if not the best player, ever at this event.”

Djokovic, who beat Murray in the Australian and French Open finals this year, was knocked out in the third round of Wimbledon, his earliest exit at a major in seven years.

Nadal, a two-time champion at the All England Club, never made the starting line because of a wrist injury.

Having faced Djokovic in seven major finals and Federer, who beat the Scot in his first Wimbledon final in 2012, in the other three, Murray will take a 6-3 lead in his head to head record with Raonic into the final.

He will be buoyed by defeating the 25-year-old on grass three weeks ago in the Queen’s Club final, 6-7 (5/7), 6-4, 6-3.

Murray also came back from two sets to one down to beat the big Canadian in the semi-finals in the Australian Open in January.

Raonic packs the fastest serve of the tournament so far, sending down a 144mph (231.7km/h) ace early in the semi-final against Federer.

He saved eight of nine break points in that tie and boasts a tournament-leading 137 aces.

Raonic has been taken the distance on two occasions at this Wimbledon — against Federer and coming back from two sets to love down to beat David Goffin in the third round.

“Andy is one of the premier workaholics,” said Raonic who was a beaten semi-finalist in 2014.

“I think Andy tries to get you doing a lot of different things. He’ll try to throw you off, give you some slower balls, some harder balls, all these kinds of things. I guess my goal is to keep him away from that, play it on my terms, be aggressive, not hesitate.”

[“source-ndtv”]

Digitization can help India leapfrog others: John Chambers

The digital economy will be worth $19 trillion (around <span class='WebRupee'>Rs.</span>6,000 trillion today) in the next 10 years and digitization is the biggest change ever, which will have 10 times greater impact than that of the Internet, says Chambers. Photo: Ramesh Pathania/Mint

The digital economy will be worth $19 trillion (around Rs.6,000 trillion today) in the next 10 years and digitization is the biggest change ever, which will have 10 times greater impact than that of the Internet, says Chambers. Photo: Ramesh Pathania/Mint

New Delhi: Digitization presents India with a chance to leapfrog other nations to become the global technology leader, John Chambers, executive chairman of Cisco Systems Inc., said on Friday.

“For India, which has been a slow follower (in technology adoption), this is a chance to leapfrog and become a technologically advanced country,” said Chambers while addressing the EmTech India event organized by MIT Technology Review and Mint in New Delhi.

Digitization is revolutionary but brutal, said Chambers, who is also the chairman of US-India Business Council.

“Majority of the companies going forward will become digital. But 40% of existing companies today will not survive the next 5 to 10 years,” he said.

“Only those who can reinvent themselves in the process will be able to survive,” he said, adding that in order to increase longevity, every company in the world has to become digital.

“Digital is basically the capability to get innovation done faster,” Chambers said. “Digitization is how you innovate and how you change business processes. It is how you will disrupt the existing systems.”

According to Chambers, the digital economy will be worth $19 trillion (around Rs.6,000 trillion today) in the next 10 years and digitization is the biggest change ever, which will have 10 times greater impact than that of the Internet.

“From the outside, you see what is going on in every country. India has a young population with an average age of 26-27,” he said, indicating that there is a lot of scope for innovation in the country.

“Then there is broadband connectivity of more than 10 Mbps being rolled out,” he said. “But most importantly, it has a leader who gets it.” Mbps, short for megabits per second, is a measure of data transfer speed.

“The transition on digitization is the biggest thing happening. India is a country whose leader is truly a visionary. (Narendra) Modi is the man with a mission and he is extremely intelligent,” said Chambers. “When he talks about digital India, he understands the complex problems we will have to face. He breaks the complex problems into smaller ones and takes action on those.”

India, the world’s largest democracy, has the courage to make that change, he added.

The other important growth engine, according to Chambers, is the start-up ecosystem.

“If you want to do a start-up, this is the right time, the inflection point has just happened in India,” said Chambers.

“Even though India (start-up ecosystem) still has a long way to go when you compare it with US (Silicon Valley) in the ’90s, India is going to see a generation of start-ups coming up who will set up examples for the world,” he added.

However, one of the major challenges that the start-up environment faces, said Chambers, is the need to change the culture.

“If a start-up fails in the Valley, it starts again. But if a start-up fails in India, it gets a bad market, which makes it unable to start over again,” he said.

Still, Chambers remains excited and bullish about India.

“Going ahead, every country has to be digital and need to change their organizational structure accordingly,” he said. “Five years from now, India will be the fastest growing country in the world.”

[“Source-Livemint”]

Extract from Alan Kitching: A Life in Letterpress by John L Walters

A beautiful new book by John L Walters on the life and work of typographer, designer and letterpress master Alan Kitching is published by Laurence King this month. In this extract, Walters examines Kitching’s departure from Omnific, the studio he founded with Derek Birdsall and Martin Lee, to concentrate on working in letterpress, and also his influence on a generation of designers.

Broadside number 8, for High Quality magazine for Heidelberg Germany, 1985

The period between 1989 and the early 1990s has acquired historical significance for all kinds of reasons, writes John L Walters. In politics it was the time of the fall of the Berlin Wall, the Velvet Revolution in the former Czechoslovakia, the end of Communism and, as some would have it, the start of the ‘end of history’. In popular music, the shift from recorded performance to electronically produced tracks gave rise to so-called ‘rave culture’.

Communications were changing, with the impact of fax machines and, later in the 1990s, email. In the worlds of design, printing and publishing, new computer-based technology was sending out ripples of change, affecting work practices and the relationships between designers and clients. The notion of desktop publishing, in parallel with the concept of samizdat publishing behind the fraying Iron Curtain, was challenging the roles of traditional printers, publishers and typesetting houses: a start-up ’zine might use Letraset or primitive computer typesetting, while established, profitable titles still sent their work to typesetters.

Yet for a small design company, a computer was still eye-wateringly expensive, and for a printer or repro house, choosing what large-scale kit – scanners, laser-setters, and so on – to invest in or upgrade to was a similarly fraught business. Yet everyone knew, after a decade of rhetoric about the ‘mighty micro’, followed by talk of the imminent ‘information superhighway’, that big changes were around the corner.

Alan Kitching had been a partner in Omnific for ten years, and a designer for nearly two decades. He decided it was time to change tack: “I couldn’t just sit at a desk, like Alan Fletcher could, or Derek Birdsall, and design something. I was never in their league. In order for me to go forward as a designer, I had to go back to something I knew.”

In June 1988 he announced his resignation from the Omnific partnership. Birdsall and Lee were taken by surprise. When they asked him what he was planning to do, Kitching simply said: ‘I want to buy the press and the type and go and print.’ The three men quickly came to an agreement, and Kitching took his share of the company in the form of the complete printing set-up, including the proofing press and the type in its cases, worth approximately £26,000. Although Omnific had acquired the equipment a few years earlier, and Birdsall had used it to make a few small cards, Kitching had been the main person to use it.

The RCA Years

Also in 1988, Birdsall recommended his colleague to the Royal College of Art, and Kitching became a visiting tutor in typography, working two days a week. Birdsall was professor of graphic design at the RCA for little more than a year, and it is a time he remembers with mixed feelings: “The best thing I did in my brief stay at the RCA was to ask Alan to take over the letterpress department. He did this with great flair, infecting the whole college and introducing several generations of students to the beautiful craft of letterpress printing, keeping it alive and transforming it into a new art form.”

It was a good moment, which Kitching describes as “a time of exploration, of restarting”, yet he was more confident than he had been as a teacher the first time round [he previously taught at the Watford School of Technology with graphic designer Anthony Froshaug]. He knew that the RCA students were of a high calibre and committed to design, so he tried to eschew the ‘evangelistic’ approach of his twenties, when he was still ‘spreading the good word about Froshaug’. He became more relaxed – he had less to prove – and he enjoyed the company of the students. He taught them how to use the letterpress studio, and he learned from them, too. “Teaching is a bit like giving a performance,’ he says. ‘You have to get them on your side, and draw them in.”

The appointment came at a perfect time for Kitching, professionally, personally and historically. It brought him into contact with a large number of ambitious students, many of whom would go on to have considerable impact on the British graphic design world (and later the international scene) over the following decades. They included Andrew Stevens and Paul Neale of Graphic Thought Facility, Henrik Kubel and Scott Williams of A2/SW/HK, Maja Sten and Maki Suzuki of Åbäke, Michele Jannuzzi and Richard Smith of Jannuzzi Smith, Silke Klinnert of Wink, Jonathan Barnbrook and Anthony Burrill.

Kitching maintained a relationship with the college until 2006. He recalls: “When I briefed the students at the start of the first workshop, I always stressed that we were not learning to be printers.” This may have come as a big surprise to those who had a more romantic, self-expressive view of the printing workshop. But Kitching always made it clear that they were designers, that he was interested in “the actual composing of the type, not even ‘typesetting’”. His purpose was to show the students how one could design using the fixed-size type system of pica/point measurement in conjunction with rules and spacing materials to make an intelligent composition within the demands of the brief. “This was always the way I personally worked,” he says. “What’s the job about? What do the words say and mean?”

Jonathan Barnbrook encountered Kitching during an unhappy first year at the college, and found that he disagreed with almost everything he said: “What I liked about [Kitching] is that he had a really strong opinion on what was typography and what wasn’t. For instance, he couldn’t accept that anything 3D could be typography, and he couldn’t accept it when I put type upside down. It was right back to ‘what is typography?’ in its purest form, and I think design education needs more people who are committed to a point of view, not just student facilitators. It helped me define my own view of typography … and at a time when computing was just starting to influence design, it reminded me that with his interest in letterpress, it was all technology that needed to be understood and worked with directly to get the best results.”

Richard Smith remembers attending Kitching’s class on the day Margaret Thatcher resigned as the British prime minister, Thursday 22 November 1990: “The first business [that day] was an interim crit with Alan, on a brief he had set with the title: ‘From the Incunabula through to Max Bill and Josef Müller-Brockmann, the Right Angle has Reigned Supreme.’ A theme redolent with history; a historic day.” There was general chatter and hubbub about the news, and Smith remembers that Kitching silenced the students with these words: “You may have heard some news this morning about Mrs T. That has nothing to do with us: we are designers.”

Ad for Kew Gardens, 1999
Ad for Kew Gardens, 1999

The Swiss designer Michele Jannuzzi recalls researching the RCA’s tutors and coming across Kitching’s name: “It was in the pre-internet era and the pictures one could gather were scarce, but what I did find in the library immediately spoke to me [in] a language of boldness, clarity and excitement.” When he came to London to study at the RCA, Jannuzzi showed Kitching his work: “With patience, Alan sat me down and, one by one, unpicked all the names of the designer-typographers I was trying to imitate in my work. It was just a simple list of names that ended with something that sounded like: ‘D-yo-r-own-thin-.” Although Jannuzzi found it difficult to understand Kitching’s north-eastern accent, the admonition that he ‘do his own thing’ rather than copying his heroes has stayed with him.

Andrew Stevens, co-founder of Graphic Thought Facility (GTF) with Paul Neale and Nigel Robinson, says Kitching encouraged students to trust their instincts. He believes this has stayed with them: “The discipline born of creating compositions within the defined context of what was available from the type case rendered the endless chin-stroking possibilities afforded by the then-nascent digital typesetting as ponderous and slow. He is a man of great character and integrity and I feel privileged to have been taught by him.”

Anthony Burrill is now well known for his letterpress posters with such simple messages as ‘Work hard and be nice to people’. He attended a series of Kitching’s one-day workshops at the RCA: “Alan’s teaching technique was very relaxed. He introduced us to the type, pointing out his favourite fonts and giving little nuggets of information along the way. He taught us how to tear paper rather than cut it, and explained his fondness for red and black ink above all others. Of course, it was in the pub that Alan gave us his best advice; he was always happy to chat and give advice over a pint.”

Danish type designer Henrik Kubel first met Kitching on a school study trip to The Typography Workshop in the mid-1990s, when Kitching sported a handlebar moustache. Kubel remembers asking him if he could buy one of his posters, at which Kitching laughed and said that he could not afford it. Kubel says: “Many years later I received a poster as a gift from Alan and Celia. It is printed in the most delicate colours, yellow and soft pink with metal type in grey on top. It is framed and on display in our design studio – I look at it every day and I think of Alan, his great work, friendship and wry wit!”

Poster for Central School of Art and Design, 1969
Poster for Central School of Art and Design, 1969

This is an extract by A Life in Letterpress by John L Walters. It is published in two forms by Laurence King: a Collector’s Edition, priced £200, which is a limited edition of 200 copies only, and includes a hand printed letterpress signed print, numbered and wrapped round the book to form a jacket; and a hardback version priced £75. More info is at laurenceking.com.

[“source-“]