Almost Half of Small Businesses Marketing Products on Social Media (INFOGRAPHIC)

According to this infographic that reveals how small businesses are using social media, About half are marketing their products.

Small businesses are waking up to the potential for using social media to market their products, a new study has found.

How Small Businesses Are Using Social Media

According to the report by SCORE, a nonprofit association for small businesses, 45 percent of these small companies use social media marketing to promote a specific product or service.

Apart from product promotion, small businesses use social media marketing for the following purposes:

  • To share information about sales and discounts (38 percent).
  • To gain likes and fans (38 percent).
  • To solicit/respond to customer feedback (34 percent).

Other purposes include providing videos to highlight products or services (29 percent), sharing a company blog post (20 percent) and establishing their personal expertise (23 percent).

Facebook: Top Choice of Small Businesses

Unsurprisingly, Facebook is the most preferred social networking site for a majority of small businesses (70 percent). Twitter (38 percent) and LinkedIn (37 percent) are a distant second and third choice.

Facebook’s unparalleled popularity among small businesses can be attributed to its massive user base, which allows businesses to connect with more customers. On top of that, the social networking giant has made its platform more business-friendly to help smaller firms leverage it for marketing purposes.

From time to time, Facebook introduces new tools and features to support small businesses’ marketing initiatives. Take the recently launched Lookalike Audience tool, for instance. Designed to help small businesses reach a global audience, the tool makes it easier for firms to expand their customer base.

“What I hear from small businesses around the world is their time and their money is precious, and we want to be the best minute and the best dollar that they spend every day,” Facebook’s VP of global SMB Dan Levy told Forbes. “We want to be number one growth driver for their business.”

Social media is all about creating that personal bond with your audience. Therefore, to make the most of it requires adopting a more personalized tone of voice. Humor works really well and any information presented in a simple to understand language gets maximum audience attention.

How can you make it simple for your audience to understand what you’re talking about? That’s the question you must always answer when you develop your content strategy for social media marketing.

Check out the infographic below for more information.

According to this infographic that reveals how small businesses are using social media, About half are marketing their products. 5

Image: Score

[“source-smallbiztrends”]

Is the Mobile App Already Dead? comScore Says We’re Nearing “Peak App” (INFOGRAPHIC)

Is the Mobile App Market Already Dead? comScore Says We’re Nearing “Peak App” MomentBarring Facebook, Messenger, Instagram and other hugely successful names, many apps are actually rarely used or even downloaded by mobile device owners. Yet many businesses spend considerable time and resources creating apps to engage customers.

A new study from comScore now says we’re nearing the “Peak App” moment, which suggests businesses should revisit their mobile app strategy.

Highlights of the comScore Report

Astonishingly, the comScore (NASDAQ:SCOR) study reveals 49 percent of smartphone users do not download any apps per month. About 24 percent of users install one or two apps over the same period.

Those who install more than five apps a month are more likely to be males aged between 18 and 44 years old, and they live in cities such as Los Angeles, Miami, San Francisco and Houston.

Interestingly, the comScore report isn’t the only recent study to highlight the declining popularity of mobile apps. Another study by app tracker SensorTower has also revealed an average 20 percent drop in downloads in the U.S.

What This Change in the Mobile App Market Means for Your Business

Declining popularity of mobile apps doesn’t come as a surprise. Think about it. How many apps do you install and actually use on your mobile device?

It’s also a choice that many users are making today because installing too many apps is inconvenient and unnecessary. So if you want to go ahead and build an app, you have to give your customers a very good reason to install it.

Vik Patel, CEO of Detroit-based Future Hosting says, “If we were to ask users to install an app, there would have to be a very good reason. Good reasons include a genuine need for access to on-device features like the camera or accelerometer, or a requirement for graphical capabilities available only to native applications.”

Building an app requires both time and money. It’s therefore important for you to explore all options before making a decision. Does your business really need an app? Is it enough for you to just optimize your website for mobile? Can you instead focus more on engaging customers on social media?

These are some questions that you must answer before making  a decision to invest in creating a mobile app.

At the same time, a mobile app can work really well for your business if you have the right strategy in place. If you are a small store owner, for instance, you can leverage your mobile app to implement loyalty programs or push notifications to drive footfalls.

“The total number of people using your apps and the time they are spending on average, those two combined is how you should measure the potential of an app to generate a lot of revenue down the line,”advises Fabien Pierre-Nicolas, VP of marketing at app analytics firm App Annie.

See more stats on apps from the coomScore report in the infographic below:

Is the Mobile App Market Already Dead? comScore Says We’re Nearing “Peak App” Moment
Download Report and Infographic

[“source-smallbiztrends”]

Weird State Laws that Affect Your Small Business (Infographic)

Weird State Laws that Affect Your Small Business

You’ve broken the law.

Don’t let it bother you too much however, because it’s likely that almost everyone in the U.S. has broken a weird state law at one point or another and guess what! No one’s coming to get you.

You’ve heard about these laws, right? Statutes that declare things like, “One may not promote a ‘horse tripping event’” or “No animal may be hunted for on Sunday with the exception of raccoons, which may be hunted until 2:00 AM“.

While many of these laws are a throwback to different times, they’re still on the books and enforceable as they were when created.

Some, such as “Using a firearm to fish is strictly forbidden” and “It is illegal to give beer to hospital patients” may even seem titteringly relevant today. Most? Not so much.

A Sample of Weird State Laws

As a small business owner, it’s interesting to take a look at those weird state laws that affect your company. There are plenty of them including:

  • In Carmel, California, women may not wear high heels while in the city limits. So, if you sell high-heeled shoes, make sure your customers don’t wear them out.
  • In Guilford, Connecticut, only white Christmas lights are allowed for display. So don’t go crazy with the red, green and … er … every other color!
  • In Rehoboth Beach, Delaware, no person shall change clothes in his or her vehicle. Better provide employees and, potentially, customers with a changing room — to prevent the collapse of civilization.
  • In Georgia, raffles can be a crime if not registered ahead of time! If an organization not recognized as “non-profit” fails to register their raffle with the local sheriff, that group risks paying up to $10,000 in fines and spending five years in jail. Does that apply to social media raffles, too? Uh oh!
  • In Indiana, check forgery can be punished with public flogging up to 100 stripes. OK, as much as some local merchants might wish this was the case, let’s get realistic.

The list goes on and on so here’s an infographic that contains 51 of the weirdest, one from each state and from the District of Columbia (Washington, D.C.).

Enjoy and remember, stay on the straight and narrow but always keep it a little weird.

[“source-ndtv”]